Full Coverage

 Plea deal offer reported in Cleveland kidnap case
Story Photo

1 year ago

Plea deal offer reported in Cleveland kidnap case


CLEVELAND (AP) - A plea deal could be in the works for a man charged with kidnapping three women and raping them in his Cleveland home for about a decade.

Several media outlets reported Thursday a deal has been offered to resolve the case against former school bus driver Ariel Castro, who faces a 977-count indictment and has pleaded not guilty.

The prosecutor's office has declined to comment.

Defense attorney Jaye Schlachet tells The Associated Press offers and counteroffers can be expected in the plea negotiations confirmed previously. He has declined to specify if a definitive deal had been offered but says he expects to be in court on the matter Friday.

The sticking point has been whether the prosecutor would rule out the death penalty as demanded by the defense. The prosecutor has that issue under review.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Ohio kidnap suspect in court, plea talks ongoing

CLEVELAND (AP) - Attorneys for a Cleveland man accused of holding three women captive in his home for more than a decade have told a judge that plea negotiations in the case are still ongoing.

As in previous court appearances, 53-year-old Ariel Castro was dressed in an orange jail outfit and kept his chin tucked to his chest for most of the brief hearing Wednesday morning.

Castro has pleaded not guilty to nearly 1,000 counts of kidnap, rape and other crimes.

Castro's attorneys complained to Judge Michael Russo that they are having trouble getting prepared for the trial, which is tentatively scheduled for Aug. 5.

They say prosecutors have been slow to turn over evidence, an accusation denied by Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Women in Ohio kidnap case thank public for support


CLEVELAND (AP) - Three women held captive in a Cleveland home for a decade are thanking the public for their support in a YouTube video.

Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight broke their public silence in the video posted late Monday, saying the encouragement of family, friends and the public has enabled them to restart their lives.

Former bus driver Ariel Castro has pleaded not guilty to a 329-count indictment alleging he kidnapped the women off the streets between 2002 and 2004 and held them captive in his two-story home.

He fathered a 6-year-old daughter with Berry and is accused of starving and punching Knight, causing her to miscarry. He was arrested May 6, shortly after Berry broke through a door at the home and yelled to neighbors for help.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

New court hearing for Cleveland kidnapping suspect


CLEVELAND (AP) - A man charged with holding three women captive in his home for about a decade has another court hearing.

Ariel Castro has pleaded not guilty to a 329 count indictment that includes multiple kidnapping and rape charges.

Authorities accuse the 52-year-old Castro of kidnapping the women between 2002 and 2004 when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old.

Last week Cuyahoga County Judge Michael Russo ordered Castro evaluated to determine if he is mentally competent to stand trial.

The judge said he wants to make sure Castro is able to understand the charges and help attorneys in his defense.

Lawyers for Castro, being held on $8 million bond, have raised the possibility of a plea deal if the death penalty is taken off the table.

Castro's hearing is Wednesday.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Aug. trial set for Ohio man in kidnapping of women


CLEVELAND (AP) - A tentative Aug. 4 trial date has been set for an Ohio man accused of kidnapping three women and holding them in his home for about a decade.

Ariel Castro, with his wrists and ankles shackled, appeared in court in Cleveland for a brief hearing Wednesday.

As in previous court appearances, he kept his chin tucked in his chest. He answered "yes" and "no" to the judge's questions about his understanding of the proceedings.

Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) County Common Pleas Judge Michael Russo mentioned plea deal discussions raised by the defense last week. He asked that any plea deal that emerges be submitted by attorneys in writing.

The 52-year-old Castro faces another pretrial hearing June 26.

Also Wednesday, lawmakers in Columbus planned to discuss providing relief payments to the three women.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Ariel Castro pleads not guilty in Ohio kidnap case


CLEVELAND (AP) - A Cleveland man has pleaded not guilty to holding three women captive in his home for a decade and raping them.

Fifty-two-year-old Ariel Castro was arraigned Wednesday on an indictment charging him with murder, kidnapping and rape in more than 300 counts.

The murder charge involves Castro's allegedly starving and punching a pregnant woman in captivity until she miscarried.

A Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) County grand jury returned the indictment Friday against the former Cleveland school bus driver, who was fired last fall.

His $8 million dollar bond was continued.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

A man accused of holding three women captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade was scheduled for his first court appearance Wednesday to answer to hundreds of charges, including rape and kidnapping.

Ariel Castro is charged with kidnapping the three women and keeping them - sometimes restrained in chains - along with a 6-year-old girl he fathered with one of them.

A grand jury charged Castro with two counts of aggravated murder related to one act, saying he purposely caused the unlawful termination of one of the women's pregnancies. He also was indicted on 139 counts of rape, 177 counts of kidnapping, seven counts of gross sexual imposition, three counts of felonious assault and one count of possession of criminal tools.

Last week's 142-page indictment covers only the period from August 2002, when the first victim disappeared, to February 2007. Prosecutors say the investigation will continue and they are leaving the door open to pursuing a death penalty case against Castro.

News that the women had been found alive electrified the Cleveland area, where two of the victims were household names after years of searches, publicity and vigils. But elation soon turned to shock as allegations about their treatment began to emerge.

The indictment against Castro alleges he repeatedly restrained the women, sometimes chaining them to a pole in a basement, to a bedroom heater or inside a van. It says one of the women tried to escape and he assaulted her with a vacuum cord around her neck.

Later, he moved them to upstairs rooms where they were kept as virtual prisoners, according to investigators.

All the while, Castro continued driving a school bus and playing bass in local bands, with fellow musicians saying they never suspected a thing. He was fired as a bus driver last fall after leaving his bus unattended for several hours.

Castro has been held on $8 million bail. Last week he was taken off suicide prevention watch in jail. Cuyahoga County jail logs show him spending most of his time sleeping, lying on his bunk, watching TV and occasionally drawing.

Castro was arrested May 6, shortly after one of the women broke through a door and yelled to neighbors for help.

She told a police dispatcher in a dramatic 911 call: "Help me. I'm Amanda Berry. I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for 10 years, and I'm, I'm here, I'm free now."

The women - Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight - disappeared separately between 2002 and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. Each said they had accepted a ride from Castro, who remained friends with DeJesus' family and even attended vigils over the years marking her disappearance.

The women haven't spoken publicly since their rescue.

Berry, 27, told officers that she was forced to give birth in a plastic pool in the house so it would be easier to clean up. Berry said she, her baby and the two other women rescued with her had never been to a doctor during their captivity.

Knight, 32, said her five pregnancies ended after Castro starved her for at least two weeks and "repeatedly punched her in the stomach until she miscarried," authorities said.

She also said Castro forced her to deliver Berry's baby under threat of death if the baby died. She said that when the newborn stopped breathing, she revived her through mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

The picture of Castro as a friendly musician began to erode soon after the women were freed, as family members told of a man who terrorized his common-law wife, beating her and locking her in an apartment and the same house where the women were later kept.

Castro's two brothers were arrested the same day but were released at a hearing a few days later after it was determined they weren't aware of the activities of which their brother is accused. They denounced him in later interviews.

The Associated Press does not usually identify people who may be victims of sexual assault, but the names of the three women were widely circulated by their families, friends and law enforcement authorities for years during their disappearances and after they were found.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Ohio AG: Tests confirm Castro is father

CLEVELAND (AP) - The Ohio attorney general says tests have confirmed that alleged kidnapper Ariel Castro is the father of a 6-year-old girl rescued from his house with three women this week.

Attorney General Mike DeWine's office confirmed Castro's paternity in a news release Friday. DeWine says a sample of Castro's DNA was taken Thursday and forensic scientists worked through the night on the case.

The girl is the daughter of Amanda Berry, who authorities say was held for about a decade in Castro's house in Cleveland along with Gina Dejesus and Michelle Knight.

Castro is being held on $8 million bond.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Calls for privacy as kidnapping victims adjust to their freedom

(NBC News) The man accused of kidnapping three women and imprisoning them in his Cleveland home for ten years had his first court appearance Thursday.

Standing silently and with his head bowed, Ariel Castro heard the charges read against him: Four counts of kidnapping, three counts of rape against Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight.

Bond is set at $2 million per case.

His brothers Pedro and Onil Castro, who were also arrested Monday night, were arraigned on unrelated misdemeanors. Based on interviews with the women, investigators don't believe the brothers had knowledge of the kidnappings and they've been released from jail.

Instead, it appears Ariel Castro led a double life.

When Gina DeJesus disappeared, he joined the search and comforted her family.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/10dwfN0

Story Photo

1 year ago

Details limited in Cleveland captive case

CLEVELAND (AP) - Authorities in Cleveland aren't getting into the details of the decades-long ordeal three women held captive experienced.

But one city councilman says "We know that the victims have confirmed miscarriages."

The women were allegedly held by 52-year-old Ariel Castro, who now faces kidnapping and rape charges, and authorities say a DNA test will confirm whether Castro fathered one of the women's 6-year-old daughter, who also was in Castro's house.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Two of the three Cleveland kidnapping victims return home

The Cleveland man charged with holding three women captive for a decade impregnated one of them five times and punched her in the stomach until she miscarried, police said Wednesday in a chilling report on the kidnappings.

The man forced one of his captives, Michelle Knight, to deliver the baby of another captive, Ashley Berry, in a kiddie pool, and threatened to kill Knight if the baby died, police said.

The Cleveland city prosecutor charged the man, Ariel Castro, with four counts of kidnapping - one for each of the three women and one for a baby that was born to Berry six years ago. Castro was also charged with three counts of rape.

But authorities filed no charges against two of Castro's brothers who were arrested Monday night, after Berry escaped the house with the help of a neighbor. Authorities said they had no evidence that the two brothers, Pedro and Onil Castro, were involved.

The women have told investigators of rapes, pregnancies and miscarriages during their captivity, police sources told NBC News on Wednesday. The police chief said they had been bound with chains and ropes.

Police were seeking corroboration of the women's accounts where possible, the sources said.

Another of the women, Gina DeJesus, gave the first details of her capture, the sources said: She told investigators she was abducted on her way home from school one day in 2004 when a man pulled up in a van and casually said, "You need a ride? I'll give you a ride home from school."

Police have said that Berry gave birth to a daughter six years ago in captivity. The women have told investigators that they were kept isolated from each other in locked rooms, the sources said. One source cautioned that it was hard to be sure the women's memories were completely accurate after such a long time in captivity.

DeJesus and Berry returned home to their families Wednesday, both to cheering crowds and huge displays of balloons, ribbons, teddy bears and encouraging signs. DeJesus gave a thumbs up.

"She was happy," said her aunt, Sandra Ruiz. "She looked at the house and wanted a tour."

Knight remained in a Cleveland hospital and was getting mental health treatment, her mother said.

McGrath said investigators had confirmed that the women were held with chains and ropes, and allowed only "once in a while" into the backyard. He said that the women's physical well-being was "very good, considering the circumstances."

Cleveland authorities said that a search of the house had revealed no human remains. FBI agents returned to the house Wednesday and also searched a house two doors down that appeared to be abandoned.

The three women were reported missing in Cleveland between 2002 and 2004. Berry made a break for freedom Monday night, kicking the door and screaming, and a neighbor, Charles Ramsey, helped free her. In her 911 call, Berry pleaded with the dispatcher to send help: "I'm Amanda Berry. I've been on the news for the last 10 years."

Berry is now 27, DeJesus 23 and Knight 32.

McGrath said that the house, a shabby, two-story dwelling on Cleveland's West Side, had come to the attention of police only twice - in 2000, when Ariel Castro called about a fight on the street, and in 2004, when Castro, a school bus driver, had left behind one of his passengers.

The chief's account conflicts with that of at least one neighbor, Israel Lugo, who told MSNBC on Tuesday that he called the police in 2011 after his sister spotted a woman with a baby in the home, banging on the window "like she wants to get out."

McGrath said that his department would have a record of such a call and that there was none. He said that he was "absolutely confident" that his officers did not miss a chance to free the three women.

Ariel Castro, 52, was accused in 2005 of attacking his former wife, The Plain Dealer newspaper reported. Her lawyer at the time said that although the ex-wife had custody of their children, Castro "frequently abducts daughters and keeps them from mother,'' the newspaper reported.

Khalid Samad, a community organizer, told NBC News that Castro had accompanied him on searches for the missing women.

A cousin of the three men, Maria Castro Montes, told NBC News that the family never had reason to suspect the three brothers, who she said had grown more distant from the family in recent years.

"We are just so sorry for everything that they had to endure," she said of the three kidnapped women, "and we want them to know that if they ever need anything, we are here for them."

First lady Michelle Obama told NBC News that the kidnappings were "probably a parent's worst nightmare."

"These families are going to have to wrap their arms around these young women and make sure that they get all the help and support they need so that they will go on and lead healthy, normal lives," she told TODAY. "We're just grateful that they're safe."

Story Photo

1 year ago

Rescued Ohio woman's mom hasn't spoken to her yet

CLEVELAND (AP) - The mother of one of the three women held captive for about a decade at an Ohio home says she hasn't spoken to her daughter yet, but she hopes she knows she loves her and missed her the whole time.

Barbara Knight, mother of Cleveland kidnap victim Michelle Knight, tells NBC's "Today" show that when her daughter disappeared at age 20 in 2002, police and she thought she maybe just didn't want to see her family anymore. She says her daughter's child had been removed from the home just before her disappearance. She says she thought Michelle vanished because she was upset about "the baby."

She says she knows her daughter is likely angry at the world "because she probably thought she'd never be found."

Knight adds that she hopes their past tension can heal, and she wants to take her daughter back to Florida, where she now lives.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Police found restraints in suspect's Ohio house

CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland police say investigators have found ropes and chains inside the house where three women were found alive.

Police spokesman Sammy Morris confirmed on Wednesday that the restraints were among evidence collected by law enforcement officials who've been combing through the house.

Charges against the man who owns the home and his two brothers are expected to come Wednesday.

Ariel Castro and his brothers are in jail but haven't been charged in the missing-persons case.

A 911 call led police to his house near downtown Cleveland where the three women, who disappeared over several years, were found Monday.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Police: Ohio women held with ropes, chains in home


CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland's police chief says the three women held captive in a house for nearly a decade were restrained with ropes and chains and allowed out into the back yard occasionally.

Chief Michael McGrath said in an interview on NBC's "Today" show Wednesday that the physical condition of the three women rescued Monday was "very good considering the circumstances."

McGrath says he was "absolutely" sure police did everything they could to find the women over the years. He disputed claims by neighbors that officers had been called to the house before for suspicious circumstances.

McGrath says the three men who have been arrested in the case "are talking" but he wouldn't say if they have confessed. He says a charging decision could come later Wednesday.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Found Ohio women reminds of missing persons on the Central Coast

Cheers erupted in Cleveland, Ohio on Monday, following the discovery of three women who had been missing for 10 years. It was almost a reminder of others, who have also made the brave return back home, such as Elizabeth Smart and Jaycee Lee Dugard.

"I can't imagine what homecoming like that must be, missing somebody for so long, and wondering every day where they were," said Garin Sinclair, office manager for the James R. Murphy Law Corporation.

Sinclair, whose law firm represents the family of Kristin Smart, told KSBY on Tuesday, those happy endings have yet to come for everyone. Smart has been missing for 17 years. The Cal Poly freshman vanished in 1996.

Sinclair said, "You never give up on your children. You never give up on your friends or helping them find some type of peace. And so, we'll keep it going for as long as it takes to find out what happened to Kristin."

The law firm, which is based out of Arroyo Grande, keeps a tall sign in front of it's building that states "MISSING CAL POLY STUDENT, Kristin D. Smart" along with her photo. Sinclair said they've kept the sign up for more than 12 years to keep the public aware that the case is still very much open.

"I also have two daughters, and I can't imagine keeping the light going," said Sinclair.

Sinclair said hope for some kind of resolution is what keeps the Smart family going. It is, perhaps, the same hope that kept the Ohio victims from giving up.

She said, "It's absolutely amazing. And, I think in your heart, once you have children, you know the connection you have is really never broken and the thought that they could come home."

Story Photo

1 year ago

McDonald's to Ohio man: 'We'll be in touch'

NEW YORK (AP) - McDonald's says it will reach out to a man widely quoted in accounts of the three women who were found in Cleveland after they went missing about a decade ago.

Charles Ramsey, who lives in the neighborhood where the women were found, noted in an interview with a local TV station that he was eating McDonald's when the scene unfolded Monday. He also made note of his meal in a 911 call. Both the interview and the 911 call went viral online.

On Tuesday, the world's biggest hamburger company said on Twitter: "We salute the courage of Ohio kidnap victims & respect their privacy. Way to go Charles Ramsey - we'll be in touch."

Representatives for McDonald's, based in Oak Brook, Ill., did not immediately return calls for comment.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Families celebrate return of three women missing for years

CLEVELAND (AP) - The sign outside a Cleveland home reads, "Welcome Home Gina."

It's the home of the parents of Gina DeJesus, one of the three women who'd been missing for about a decade and were found yesterday in a home in downtown Cleveland. Police say they'd apparently been held captive in the house since they disappeared. Three brothers, including the owner of the home, are under arrest.

Police say the 6-year-old girl who was also found in the home is believed to be the daughter of Amanda Berry, one of the three women who'd been missing.

An aunt of Gina DeJesus says the women all showed great strength to survive in the years since they disappeared. Sandra Ruiz spoke after visiting with all three women.

They've been released from a hospital, and taken to an undisclosed location in the Cleveland suburbs.

Meanwhile, there are reports that police may have missed some earlier opportunities to find the three missing women. Neighbors of the house where the women were found say police were called twice in recent years to investigate suspicious activity there. One man says he heard pounding on doors at the house. Another neighbor says her daughter once saw a naked woman crawling on her hands and knees in the backyard.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Finally Free! Women held captive for nearly 10 years escape Cleveland basement

(NBC News) "Help me, I'm Amanda Berry."

With one frantic 911 call on Monday evening, three women missing for years were found in a Cleveland house where they had been held against their will by three brothers, police in Ohio said.

"I've been kidnapped," Berry, who disappeared a decade ago, told the dispatcher. "I've been missing for 10 years and I'm out here. I'm free now."

Authorities heaped praise on Berry, now 27 and the mother of a 6-year-old.

"The real hero here is Amanda," said Deputy Police Chief Ed Tomba.

Berry and two other women, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight, went missing between 2000 and 2004 in separate incidents. The women were all between the ages of 14 and 20 when they vanished.

Neighbors and relatives celebrated the happy ending, but for some, the years had taken their toll. Berry's mother died in 2006, not knowing whether her daughter was alive or dead.

Three suspects are under arrest -- former school-bus driver Ariel Castro, 52, and his brothers Pedro, 54, and O'Neal, 50, Cleveland police said. A search warrant related to the arrest was executed by police at an address on Seymour Avenue in Cleveland, police said.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said at a Tuesday press conference that there are many unanswered questions: "Why were they taken, how they were taken and how they remained undetected in the city of Cleveland for all this time?"

The three women were taken to nearby Metro Health Medical hospital, along with Berry's child, officials said.

All three women were released from the hospital Tuesday morning, the hospital said in a statement, after reporting earlier in the morning that they had been in "fair condition."

"The nightmare is over," said Cleveland FBI Special Agent in Charge Stephen Anthony. "These three young ladies have provided us with the ultimate definition of survival and perseverance. The healing can now begin."

The three disappearances had stumped police in Cleveland and shaken the community for years. Berry was reported missing on April 21, 2003 after she phoned her sister to say she was getting a ride home from her job at a fast food restaurant. About one year after that, 14-year-old DeJesus vanished while walking home from school.

Police said their records showed two visits to the home in recent years. In 2000, they responded to a call about a fight from Ariel Castro. In 2004, after Castro was accused of leaving a child on a bus, authorities went to the house but no one was home.

Authorities said they never stopped looking for the missing women, running down tips and even digging up two backyards. The break came when Berry summoned the courage to escape.

Neighbor Charles Ramsey said he was at home when he saw a man from across the street running to the house next door. When Ramsey went outside, he said, he saw a young woman who said she was trying to escape the house.

"This girl is kicking the door and screaming," Ramsey said. "She says, ‘I've been kidnapped and I've been in this house a long time and I want to leave right now.'"

When the door would not open Ramsey helped kick it down, he said, then allowed Berry to call 911. The young woman carried her child through the broken door, and told Ramsey it belonged to her captor. It's unclear who is the child's father.

Police then entered the house and brought out DeJesus and Knight, according to Ramsey.

Police said they have not fully debriefed the victims.

"You can only imagine the scene last night at the hospital with the family and the friends...it was chaotic," Tomba said.

Shocked relatives could hardly believe that their missing family members had been found after so many years.

Michelle Knight's mother Barbara told The Plain Dealer newspaper that she prayed police had correctly identified her daughter.

"I'm praying that if it is her, she will come back with me so I can help her recover from what she has been through," the hopeful mother said. "So much has happened in these 10 years. She has a younger sister she still has not met. I missed her so much while she was gone."

Destiny Berry, cousin to Amanda, told WKYC: "I just want to see her; I just want to see what she looks like. I just want to hold her."

Destiny and her sister were best friends with Amanda before her disappearance. "We were so close, inseparable. And when she came up missing it killed us. Going 10 years without knowing what happened to her, not knowing anything tears us apart," she said.

Another of Berry's cousins, Tasheena Mitchell, told WKYC that she was "so excited."

"I thought about her every day. I prayed about her every night. I'm just so excited that we're here. And we're so close but so far away because they won't let us in," she said. "I knew that she would come one day. I just don't understand why it took so long. I'm just happy that she's here."

The DeJesus family continued to hold out hope, holding vigils for her. DeJesus' mother, Nancy Ruiz, told WKYC at one in April: "She's still out there, and we need to bring her home."

Earlier this year a prison inmate was sentenced for admitting he gave authorities fraudulent tips about Berry's remains.

Robert Wolford, who is serving time for killing a homeless man, told police the woman was buried under a Cleveland lot, which was then dug up by backhoes.

And two men arrested for questioning about DeJesus' disappearance were released in 2006 after police failed to find the woman's remains during a search of their house.

NBC News' Ian Johnston and John Newland and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Dramatic 911 call of Cleveland woman held captive for nearly 10 years

(WKYC) Cleveland police have released the frantic 911 call made by Amanda Berry after she escaped a house Monday evening ending her 10-year disappearance.

"Help me, I'm Amanda Berry," she tells the dispatcher. "I've been kidnapped. I've been missing for 10 years and I'm out here. I'm free now."

She urges the dispatcher to send police right away. "I need them now before he gets back."

Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michele Knight were found in a home on Seymour Avenue. They ran across the street to a neighbor to call for help.

Police have taken 52-year-old Ariel Castro into custody. There's no immediate word on charges. Two others are also in custody.

A police source says Amanda Berry escaped with a six-year-old girl. The child hugged officers when they arrived. A baby was also with her.

Amanda had been missing since April 2003 when she disappeared after getting a ride home from her fast food job. DeJesus disappeared the following April from roughly the same area. Knight had been gone since 2002.Amanda: Help me, I'm Amanda Berry.

Operator: Do you need police fire or ambulance?

Amanda: I need police.

Operator: OK, what's going on there?

Amanda: I've been kidnapped and been missing for 10 years. I am here, I'm free now.

Operator: Ok, what's your address?

Amanda: 2207 Seymour Avenue.

Operator: 2207 Seymour. Looks like you are calling me from 2210.

Amanda: Huh?

Operator: It looks like you are calling me from 2210..

Amanda: I can't hear you.

Operator: It looks like you are calling me from 2210.

Amanda: I'm across the street, I'm using the phone.

Operator: OK, stay there with those neighbors and talk to the police when they get there.

Amanda: OK.

Operator: Talk to the police when they get there.

Amanda: Ok, Hello.

Operator: Yes, talk to the police when they get there.

Amanda: Ok, I don't want to leave right now.

Operator: We will get someone there as soon as we get a car open.

Amanda: No, I need them now before he gets back.

Operator: Ok, we are sending them, ok?

Amanda: Ok

Operator: Who is the guy that went out?

Amanda: His name is Ariel Castro.

Operator: How old is he?

Amanda: He's like 52, and I'm Amanda Berry, I've been on the news for the last 10 years.

Operator: Ok, I got that dear, and what is his name again?

Amanda: Ariel Castro.

Operator: What is he wearing?

Amanda: I don't know because he is not here right now.

Operator: When he left what was he wearing? The police are on the way talk to them when they get there. I told you they were on the way, talk to them when they get there.

Amanda: Ok, bye.

1 year ago

Ohio woman missing for decade has daughter

CLEVELAND (AP) - A Cleveland police official says a 6-year-old girl found in the house where three missing women were kept for years is the daughter of one of them.

A frantic 911 call led police to a house near downtown Cleveland, where the three women were found Monday.

Police say Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were held inside the house since they were in their teens or early 20s.

Cleveland police Deputy Chief Ed Tomba says the girl is believed to be Amanda Berry's daughter.

Knight disappeared in 2002, Berry in 2003 and DeJesus about a year after that.

Officials say three brothers, ages 50 to 54, are in custody.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Missing women released from hospital


CLEVELAND (AP) - The three women who disappeared a decade ago in Cleveland and were found alive are out of the hospital.

Metro Health Medical Center says all three were released Tuesday morning.

A frantic 911 call led police to a house near downtown Cleveland, where the three women were found Monday.

Police Chief Michael McGrath says Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were tied up at the house and held there since they were in their teens or early 20s.

Three brothers were arrested. Authorities released no names and gave no information about them or what charges they might face.

Story Photo

1 year ago

No complaints about house where 3 women were kept

CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland officials say they have no records of anyone calling about criminal activity at the house where three kidnapped women were kept for years before being found.

A frantic 911 call led police to a house near downtown Cleveland, where the three women were found Monday.

Officials say three brothers, ages 50 to 54, are in custody.

Police say Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were tied up at the house and held there since they were in their teens or early 20s. Knight disappeared in 2002, Berry in 2003 and DeJesus about a year after that.

Police said Tuesday they went to the home in 2004 for an unrelated investigation but no one answered the door.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

3 missing women found in Ohio, 3 brothers arrested

CLEVELAND (AP) - A neighbor says a woman who'd been missing for a decade was nervous, crying and appeared dressed in pajamas and old sandals as she escaped a Cleveland home where she said she'd been held captive.

Anna Tejeda says she was sitting on her porch with friends Monday when they heard someone kicking a door across the street and yelling for help. Tejeda speaks Spanish, so a friend translated her comments to The Associated Press.

She said the pleading woman, Amanda Berry, eventually kicked out the door's screen to escape and call police.

Two more women who separately went missing about a decade ago were found alive, and police arrested three brothers.

The police chief said he thinks the women were tied up at the house and held there for years.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail

»Comments

PLEASE HELP US MODERATE COMMENTS

Offensive or inappropriate comments are subject to removal. To report a comment, please e-mail us at feedback@ksby.com, and include the name of the story and information on the comment.

Thank you! KSBY.com


Comments

Most Popular

Top Videos

1 2 3 4